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Weapons Training

Sword Training

From long time ago, martial artists have used weapons to defend themselves, their loved ones and homelands in case of any attacks or physical confrontations. They can also be used for self defense. There are martial arts weapons training offered in Sydney if you want to learn them for defense purposes. Whatever reason you may have for using them, you need to know how to go about it.

 

There is this group named “The King of Weapons” referring to Gun (staff), Dao (sabre), Jian (sword) and Qiang (Spear). The following are the introduction of these four major weapons trainings:

 

 

Sword (Jian)

 

Jian Shu (Sword Skills) techniques focus much on its agility and nimbleness. It employs mainly point, burst, slash, thrust, uppercut, upward parry, cloud, pierce, entwine, sweep, intercept, block, etc. The tips for being good at this art are to focus on being light, deft and accurate. The focusing power should be at the Jian’s tip or front most section.

 

Jian Shu should be light and fast; nimble and agile. 

 

In the famous Martial Arts text “Bi Shou Lu”, there was a verse regarding the principle of Jian Shu.  It was stated inside that Jian Shu should be light and fast; nimble and agile. In the practice of Jian, having a responsive grip and agile wrist plays are very important. It is like be in possession of a lively air and rhythm, flowing seamlessly from intention to expression. The collective goal of Jian Shu is in achieving the state of body and weapon as one.

 

 

Broadswords (Dao)

 

The Chinese broadsword is one of the most popular and common weapons in china. Unlike the Jian, the broadsword is single edged and curved. They are also known as Dao or do. This weapon is very powerful when it comes to self defense.

 

Dao Shu (Chinese Broadsword Skills) here refers mainly to the single Dao (Broadsword). It is normally wielded by a single hand. Dao Shu places great emphasis on the motion of the Dao, and is closely complemented by the motion of the free hand (i.e., the left hand for right-handers). There is a saying that “Judge the single Dao wielder by watching his free hand, Judge the double Dao wielder by watching his body form in motion”.

 

 Strokes like wrapping and twining, thrusting and slashing project a fast and furious power like a ferocious tiger emerging from the wild.

 

One to achieve the following advantages by coordinating the Dao and the free hand:

 

  • Harmonise the motion of the body and limbs
  • Achieve dynamic balance during motion
  • Mobilise power in the Dao strokes

 

Foot work in Dao Shu requires quickness and there is much of running and jumping involved. Strokes like wrapping and twining, thrusting and slashing project a fast and furious power like a ferocious tiger emerging from the wild.

 

 

Staff (Gun)  

 

Gun Shu (Cudgel Skills) techniques consists of:

 

  • Long ranged strokes – chop, sweep, swing, uppercut
  • Short ranged strokes – point, burst, poke, press, block

 

Gun practice should achieve strokes that are both far reaching in all directions and as dense as rain.

 

In Gun (Cudgel) wielding, both long and short ranged techniques are used in concert in order to threaten the foes on all sides at once. This technique required pouring forth strokes that change quickly at will between spare and dense, far and close.

 

The key to improve in Gun Shu lies in improving familiarity with the various ways to grasp the Gun. Besides, the way of changing your grasps nimbly during combat also played an important role. In order to be ever changing and evolving in application, Gun practice should achieve strokes that are both far reaching in all directions and as dense as rain.  It is to project a fierce and indomitable spirit by using both ends of the Gun.

 

Spear Training

The Spear (Qiang)

 

Qiang is referring to spear in Chinese term. It moves quickly and when you use it against your opponent.

 

Qiang Shu (Spear Skills) emphasizes mainly on the thrust technique. In thrusting, the entire body’s power is required to transmit the power in a straight line motion from the body to the tip of spear.

 

Qiang strokes such as the slash, slams, parry outwards and inwards creates an imposing momentum like a weaving dragon. 

 

There is a rule of “three points alignment”, which means that the

  • “top point” -  the tip of the nose
  • “middle point” – the tip of the Qiang
  • “lower point” – the tip of the foot

 

All these three point must all be aligned in the same vertical plane to allow the power of the whole body to focus at the Qiang tip. This will help to accurately projecting a thrust to the target.

 

Basic Qiang handling stance is called the “four levels stance” which values the following four levels:

 

The “four levels” refers to:

 

  • The head being level
  • The shoulders being level
  • The Qiang being level
  • The feet being level

 

The lively display of Qiang strokes such as the slash, slams, parry outwards and inwards creates an imposing momentum like a weaving dragon. 

 

Weapons training is for more advanced kung fu practitioners. You are welcome to join our weapons training in Sydney if you have solid foundation of martial arts.